Suffolk County Community College

 

PSY-210  Lifespan Psychology                                            Prof. R. Morse                                      

 

Berger 8th Ed. Ch 23 Practice Questions

 

The Multiple Choice questions that follow are taken from a Test Bank developed by Kathleen Stassen Berger, the author of our textbook.  The answers to these questions can be obtained by sending me an e-mail with your proposed answer key.  Some of these questions will appear on your Final exam.

1.

Which of the following statements about gerontology and geriatrics is true?

 

A)

They tend to view old age from similar perspectives.

 

B)

Geriatrics, but not gerontology, is a medical specialty.

 

C)

Gerontologists generally view aging as a necessary ill.

 

D)

Geriatrics leads to the view of aging as a socially constructed problem.

 

2.

Approximately how many people in the United States are over the age of 100?

 

A)

9200

 

B)

920,000

 

C)

92,000

 

D)

9,200,000

 

3.

When graphing population changes in developed nations, a population problem that may arise is:

 

A)

zero-growth rate.

 

B)

another “baby boom.”

 

C)

a surge in multiple births.

 

D)

a lack of babies.

 

4.

In developed nations, the most common living arrangement for people over age 65 is living:

 

A)

in a nursing home.

 

B)

with adult children.

 

C)

with a spouse or alone.

 

D)

with an unrelated age-mate.

 

5.

The changes of primary aging are:

 

A)

caused by disease.

 

B)

reversible.

 

C)

preventable.

 

D)

universal.

 

6.

Which of the following treatments for insomnia is best for older adults?

 

A)

electrical stimulation of the brain

 

B)

narcotic drugs

 

C)

self-administration of alcohol

 

D)

accepting changes as normal

 

7.

The age group least likely to be involved in motor vehicle accidents is people aged:

 

A)

25–34.

 

B)

35–44.

 

C)

45–54.

 

D)

55–64.

 

8.

Now that Hank is 75, he uses selective optimization with compensation while driving. For example, he:

 

A)

drives only at night when fewer cars are on the road.

 

B)

relies only on rearview and side mirrors so he won't hurt his neck turning his head.

 

C)

drives more slowly.

 

D)

drives fast to get home as soon as possible to avoid accidents.

 

9.

Between 1984 and 2004, the proportion of U.S. elderly who had difficulty doing housework or shopping declined from 16 percent to ______ percent.

 

A)

12

 

B)

10

 

C)

8

 

D)

2

 

10.

In a study of Dutch elders, what proportion became fearful and reduced their activity after a fall?

 

A)

one-half

 

B)

one-third

 

C)

three-quarters

 

D)

two-thirds

 

11.

Which of the following strategies is crucial when older people have sensory loss?

 

A)

acceptance

 

B)

reduction in time spent out of the home

 

C)

compensation

 

D)

greater dependency

 

12.

The notion that DNA regulates the aging process is referred to as the:

 

A)

cellular accident.

 

B)

error catastrophe.

 

C)

genetic clock.

 

D)

free-radical hypothesis.

 

13.

The concept of aging as a result of cellular duplication errors is based on the fact that the body's ability to make new cells that are exact copies of the original ones:

 

A)

stops at about age 18.

 

B)

stops at about age 80.

 

C)

is altered by mutations as time goes on.

 

D)

continues unchanged throughout life.

 

14.

B-cells defend the body against invaders by:

 

A)

invading the bone marrow.

 

B)

attacking cancer cells.

 

C)

producing antibodies against bacteria and viruses.

 

D)

making the circulatory system more efficient.

 

 

15.

When human cells are grown under laboratory conditions that encourage them to grow and divide, cells:

 

A)

from human embryos stop dividing after about 50 divisions.

 

B)

from children divide more quickly than those of adults.

 

C)

lose their DNA.

 

D)

continue to reproduce themselves forever.

 

16.

The groups of people who traditionally live to advanced age usually:

 

A)

work throughout life.

 

B)

live in communities that provide superior medical care.

 

C)

eat a very high-protein diet.

 

D)

drink alcohol daily.

 

17.

A cultural factor that may increase longevity is:

 

A)

polygamy.

 

B)

being integrated into the community.

 

C)

believing in life after death.

 

D)

being segregated from the noise and activity of children.

 

18.

Factors that contribute to a long life include:

 

A)

early retirement and moderate exercise.

 

B)

one to two glasses of red wine daily and social interaction.

 

C)

respect and much relaxation.

 

D)

lifelong work and a diet rich in fresh vegetables.

 

19.

For people who reach late adulthood in good health, the most important determinant of longevity may be:

 

A)

medical care.

 

B)

the climate in which they live.

 

C)

the calorie content of their diet.

 

D)

their activities and attitudes.

 

20.

Mrs. Calderi is 90 years old and, as a typical person in late adulthood, she:

 

A)

is in the best of health with only minor aches and pains.

 

B)

feels deserted by everyone and lonely most of the time.

 

C)

is quite happy and enjoying her life.

 

D)

finds her daily activities to be severely limited.